Night at the Museum | Cool Down Drama Game

Night at the Museum is a popular cool down drama game that helps improve focus and physical expression. It is safe to play while social distancing or teaching virtually and is perfect for a preschool class!

COVID-19 Update!
To ensure social distancing, have the students stand two metres apart. The museum guard should stand at the front and turn around to face the group, instead of moving around the room. The statues can move on the spot.


Instructions

  • Choose one student to be the museum guard.
  • Select the theme of your museum.
  • Students should freeze to represent a statue of something you would find in this museum.
  • The guard walks around the room.
  • When the guard is not looking at them, students should move.
  • Students must freeze when the guard is looking.
  • Anyone that the guard sees moving is eliminated.
  • The final person becomes the guard in the following round.

Top tip: with younger children, the teacher can act as the museum guard and students do not need to be eliminated.

In my experience

Night at the Museum is a great drama game for younger kids and can also be used as a way to explore emotions, characters and physical expression. Ask the students to freeze in the museum in a way that shows happiness with their body. Ask them to freeze in a way that shows a sneaky character with their body – explore this idea more by discussing their choices. Get your students to create a tableau or frozen scene with their bodies. It’s a fantastic introduction to bigger ideas.

This activity is part of our ‘A Day at the Zoo’ drama lesson plan for ages 3-6. Available to UK readers and USA readers.

Need help keeping your students socially distant? Try marking a space using the following:

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Rebecca is the founder and chief executive officer of Silly Fish Learning Ltd. She is a children's playwright with a vast and varied career in education, primarily teaching drama and English.

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